NPR’s Science Friday – Curiosity Hits Paydirt: New Clues to Life on Mars

“Microbes may have once happily existed on the surface of Mars, according to chemical analysis of a sedimentary rock in the Red Planet’s Gale Crater. NASA geologist and exobiologist David Blake discusses evidence for an ancient freshwater lake in the crater, and describes the mineral-chomping microbes that might have thrived there.” http://www.sciencefriday.com/segment/03/15/2013/curiosity-hits-paydirt-new-clues-to-life-on-mars.html […]

Read More…

NASA ROVER FINDS CONDITIONS ONCE SUITED FOR ANCIENT LIFE ON MARS

RELEASE: 13-20AR NASA ROVER FINDS CONDITIONS ONCE SUITED FOR ANCIENT LIFE ON MARSMOFFETT FIELD, Calif. — An analysis of a rock sample collected by NASA’s Curiosity rover shows ancient Mars could have supported living microbes. Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon — some of the key chemical ingredients for life — in […]

Read More…

Curiosity Team Wins 2012 Collier Trophy

AOPA Pilot (3/14, Namowitz) reported on the same day NASA was announcing the first findings from Curiosity’s drill, “the NASA/JPL Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity Project Team learned that another pending question had been answered in the positive: The National Aeronautic Association announced that the team had won the 2012 Robert J. Collier Trophy ‘in recognition of […]

Read More…

In memorium – Robert H. Rubin 1941-2013

Bob Rubin 1941-2013

Remembrance Gathering for Bob Rubin, Space Science and Astrobiology Auditorium, Bldg. 245, 3 p.m.POC: Sean Colgan, mailto:sean.colgan@nasa.gov Ames employees are welcome to attend a remembrance gathering for Bob Rubin, April 12, at 3 p.m. Bob’s hometown was Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed undergraduate and graduate studies at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. His advisor, […]

Read More…

CheMin analyzes first drilled sample on Mars

CheMin analyzes first drilled sample on Mars

Left image: At the center is the hole in a rock called “John Klein” where the Curiosity rover conducted its first sample drilling on Mars. The sample-collection hole is 0.63 inch (1.6 centimeters) in diameter and 2.5 inches (6.4 centimeters) deep. The “mini drill” test hole near it is the same diameter, with a depth […]

Read More…